GODS EQUATION PDF

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Are we on the verge of solving the riddle of creation using Einstein's "greatest blunder"? In a work that is at once lucid, exhilarating and. “Euler's equation reaches down into the very depths of existence.” – Keith as a Creator, he would be a mathematician, and the “God Equation” would be the. Request PDF on ResearchGate | On Jan 1, , Amir D. Aczel and others published God's Equation: Einstein, Relativity, and the Expanding Universe.


Gods Equation Pdf

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God's equation by Amir D. Aczel, , Four Walls Eight Windows edition, in English. Equations of. Discontinuity .. equation is one of the most famous formulas in physics today. A further ample, Max Born's finding that God – contrary to Ein-. To ask other readers questions about God's Equation, please sign up. .. "The greatest achievement in life" at tyoususnappsave.ga has been reviewed .

Gave me some new insights into Generla Relativity and non Euclidian space. Nov 26, Robert Maier rated it liked it You want to read this book because you think it will reveal the deepest secrets of the universe and answer, why? It offers much to think about, and pretty clearly shows the progression of the Big Bang origin of the universe which began with astronomers like Galileo and advanced maths of the s.

Dimensional Structure of and Variation in Anthropomorphic Concepts of God

Einstein built his theories of relativity on many shoulders. At the end of the day spoiler there are still several competing theories leading to a universal theory of how the universe sprang from nothi You want to read this book because you think it will reveal the deepest secrets of the universe and answer, why? At the end of the day spoiler there are still several competing theories leading to a universal theory of how the universe sprang from nothing, and will it ever end.

No one seems near a conclusion or real proof that explains matter and space-- God's Equation.

Aczel's inclusion of personal material about Einstein, his muses and colleagues, provides a good break from the science. The mathematics was way over my head.

I still don't understand how time can be a fourth dimension, how gravity works, or how matter can travel near the speed of light for billions of years and not slow down, or how an arrow shot into the air would eventually return to its starting point.

For the non-mathematical person, the key point is that the universe is such a complex system with many different rules governing operations that are inconceivable for anyone living now. If the human race survives a few thousand more years, we may understand more, but much of what we know already has been used and studied for more than 2, years, when Euclid "founded" geometry.

Considering the universe, with it's unfathomable distances and unimaginable speeds, geometry is woefully inadequate, and even much of Einstein's work only scratches the surface for why the universe appears to be expanding or where did all the matter come from, or why is there life on earth. Don't confuse matters with unrelated stuff.

I don't see that an open, expanding universe is such a problem. See my comment for a discussion of Missing matter. View 1 comment. Great read. Aczel told how Einstein developed the theories of relativity with a special emphasis on the mathematics behind it and then told of later developments with the equation.

However, the biographical information and story-telling attributes kept me engaged and there was a lot of look at the physics, cosmology, and astrology going on even though mathematics was obviously the focus. Nov 18, Danielle rated it it was ok Shelves: This was over my head I lost him when he began using 3 or 4 pages to describe a single equation.

What I got out of it? The universe is expanding at an accelerating rate. How do we know this? I have no idea I think that's what the book was trying to explain.

Oh well -- the parts I did understand were very interesting. Dec 24, Gary rated it really liked it. Really good book, but definitely a hard read. Aug 06, Larry rated it liked it. Liked the book but mathematical details lost me big time. Interesting to see the progresion of Einsteins work. Too much biographic detail of some of the sub characters.

Would hae loved more about his later life. Gave me some new insights into Generla Relativity and non Euclidian space. Nov 26, Robert Maier rated it liked it.

You want to read this book because you think it will reveal the deepest secrets of the universe and answer, why? It offers much to think about, and pretty clearly shows the progression of the Big Bang origin of the universe which began with astronomers like Galileo and advanced maths of the s.

Einstein built his theories of relativity on many shoulders. At the end of the day spoiler there are still several competing theories leading to a universal theory of how the universe sprang from nothi You want to read this book because you think it will reveal the deepest secrets of the universe and answer, why? At the end of the day spoiler there are still several competing theories leading to a universal theory of how the universe sprang from nothing, and will it ever end.

No one seems near a conclusion or real proof that explains matter and space-- God's Equation. Aczel's inclusion of personal material about Einstein, his muses and colleagues, provides a good break from the science. The mathematics was way over my head. I still don't understand how time can be a fourth dimension, how gravity works, or how matter can travel near the speed of light for billions of years and not slow down, or how an arrow shot into the air would eventually return to its starting point.

For the non-mathematical person, the key point is that the universe is such a complex system with many different rules governing operations that are inconceivable for anyone living now. If the human race survives a few thousand more years, we may understand more, but much of what we know already has been used and studied for more than 2, years, when Euclid "founded" geometry.

Considering the universe, with it's unfathomable distances and unimaginable speeds, geometry is woefully inadequate, and even much of Einstein's work only scratches the surface for why the universe appears to be expanding or where did all the matter come from, or why is there life on earth.

This book is a good mental exercise, but you could ponder the birds at your bird feeder and come up with just as few answers. On the one hand the universe came from nothing, but as atoms and sub-atomic particles formed and became molecules, they must have followed some rules, but where did the rules come from?

Many people are happy with the answer "God," was always here, created the rules, and guides and adjusts them to his whims. Problem is, where did God come from. Good question. It's fun to see people asking, and though we certainly know much more about the world than we did 5, years ago, it's like scooping up a handful of sand on the beach and saying you know everything about the world.

Nov 03, Darren rated it really liked it. Thankfully, for a book with God in it's title, there is zero religious connotation in it's content; it is pure science.

However, there are more than a few equations cited in this book, but the reader need not fret as the equations do not hinder nor strengthen the books overall effect; they do give the story validity - there is no stronger proof than a mathematical one. Soon after publishing the special theory of relativity in , Einstein started thinking about how to incorporate gravity into h Thankfully, for a book with God in it's title, there is zero religious connotation in it's content; it is pure science.

Soon after publishing the special theory of relativity in , Einstein started thinking about how to incorporate gravity into his new relativistic framework.

In , beginning with a simple thought experiment involving an observer in free fall, he embarked on what would be an eight-year search for a relativistic theory of gravity. After numerous detours and false starts, his work culminated in the presentation to the Prussian Academy of Science in November of what are now known as the Einstein field equations.

These equations specify how the geometry of space and time is influenced by whatever matter and radiation are present, and form the core of Einstein's general theory of relativity. Aczel effectively chronicles the history of Einstein's rise to fame due to the fateful observation of the bending of light by the sun during a solar eclipse. This eclipse was photographed from the expedition of Sir Arthur Eddington to the island of Principe off the west coast of Africa. Positions of star images within the field near the Sun were used to test Albert Einstein's prediction of the bending of light around the Sun from his general theory of relativity.

These observations vindicated Einstein's General Relativity over Newton's light-particle theory, and catapulted him into unparalleled world fame for a physicist.

Despite knowing the story from several other books and courses, I was pleased to learn some new tidbits from this book, like the fact that Einstein was not INFORMED of the vindication of GR for many months after it was experimentally observed!

That could not happen in today's socially networked world. Overall an enjoyable science-packed read.

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Feb 21, Brian rated it it was amazing. I solved the equation and my book burst into flames. That can't be a good sign. I loved that book too. Aug 28, Brent rated it liked it Shelves: Amir D. Aczel has an amazing penchant for taking highly technical and scientific concepts and communicating them in a very clear and, I suppose, dumbed down manner for those of us who haven't studied physics or mathematics.

He does exactly that in this book as he covers Einstein's development of the general theory of relativity and it's implications on our understanding of the beginnings and future of our universe. I was really fascinated by the concepts in general.

As a humanities guy, I never s Amir D. As a humanities guy, I never spent time in the world of physics, yet have always wondered about so many of the concepts.

And getting a cursory view into cosmology was really fun. As a result, often he casually drops in discussions of equations and such that must be considered common knowledge for those with a minimal education in math or physics.

Unfortunately, I'm not one of them. So I was often lost, particularly in the details. In the long run, I felt myself treating those sections much like I did many a math class long ago - the equations were Greek to me, so I tried my best to understand the surround materials and explanations.

That worked for the most part, but it did make for very slow and concentrated reading.

All in all, though, it was a compelling look into the world of cosmology and getting a peak into the make up of the four dimensions of time and space and how our understanding of these dimensions may help us to finally understand our universe, and therefore, creation as a whole. Jun 25, Erin rated it it was amazing. Who can I persuade to read this book?

Must you be a mathematician to get excited about it? Einstein said, "Math is Nature's language for describing herself" or something very near that. His chin dips the water, and he spins the cylinder again. Then, without resetting, he squeezes the trigger … thrice. His grip fails him, and his gun falls on the bathroom floor beside an empty syringe.

He sinks further into the tub.

Einstein, Relativity, and the Expanding Universe

His body twitches, and he slips into a coma. I watch him drown in lukewarm water, frothy vomit, and bloody piss. I watch him die. I whisper into his ear.

Suddenly, his eyes open and for an instant he sees my face. My body convulses. I inhale and foul water burns my nose and lungs.

My face breaks the surface of the water and I cough, gasp for air, and try to get my bearings. I cough some more, and struggle to take a real breath. I throw up at the edge of the tub.

I am alone in the bathroom. With a primitive brain that limits my perceptions, and a drugged out bag of flesh that traps my true strength.

A cellphone rings. With wet fingers, I pick up the device from the floor, and answer the call. I move to the shower area and rinse myself for a few minutes. Like all bodies, I can feel this one dying on me.

Not from drugs, but plain mortality. As I towel dry, I examine the body in the mirror. Lightly tanned.

God’s Equation

Spanish mestizo, mid-twenties, with a pug nose, unibrow, bristle-cut hair, and a tattoo of a flaming skull behind the shoulder. He has no muscle tone. I pick up the revolver, wipe off the moisture, and check the chamber.

Not exactly a flaming sword, but pretty damn close.

God's equation

I turn the cylinder slowly, aligning the loaded chamber with the firing pin. I enter the bedroom and search through his luggage. I tuck the. I smell semen and blood on the empty, unmade bed, and I detect the scent of two females, one human, the other— The doorbell rings.To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. God's Equation, starts with Einstein and special relativity where the mathematical tools Lorentz transformations and math of space-time worked out by Minkowski required already existed.

Aug 06, Larry rated it liked it Liked the book but mathematical details lost me big time.

The order comes directly from His Holiness. It is difficult to say that Aczel does a "good" job in this book, because he does some things so exceptionally well that it strikes the senses that he does other things so poorly.